The State of the State of California

We offer without comment an excerpt from urbanologist Joel Kotkin’s assessment of California housing trends:

“What’s causing California’s housing crunch? Misguided progressive policies that have slowed housing construction are at least partly to blame. Construction firms, for example, must pay “prevailing wages” when undertaking some new housing projects, raising building costs by as much as 37 percent. Recent new subsidized “affordable” units in the Bay Area cost upward of $700,000 to complete. Urban theorists and planners promote government-enforced “density” requirements on new developments, ignoring data that show high-density construction to be as much as five times as costly per square foot as low-density construction. Those costs make it harder for developers to profit from housing construction, and hence less likely to build, and when they do build, the higher price tag gets passed on to residents. Those that can afford it though, often enjoy Ecominded Solutions contractors to build their own dream home. In their mind, they’d rather pay to have a house built with how expensive houses can be in California. If you’re interested in seeing Ecominded Solutions work to see if they could be right for your dream home build check out their design and build service here. Because many think building a home is more cost-effective than buying a home in the area and a lot more cost-effective than renting. Rent control now enjoys widespread support, but it, too, discourages new housing construction. However, some people are looking into the planning and development of new construction homes through companies similar to Saussy Burbank. Many new home buyers are looking for houses that have been constructed in a way that best suits them and their needs. The contractors of these new builds could have decided to build these houses using eco-friendly building materials, such as Plastic Wood Boards, Posts & Sheets. This is due to more emphasis being placed on how the environment is getting treated and more people would like to do their bit to make sure it stays in perfect condition. For some homeowners though, they just want a roof over their heads.

“California’s dramatic demographic shift has added its own problems to the housing crisis. Since 2010, California’s white population has dropped by 270,000, while its Hispanic population has grown by more than 1.5 million. Hispanics and African-Americans now constitute 45 percent of California’s total population. Almost a third of the state’s Hispanics and a fifth of its African-Americans live on the edge of poverty. Incomes have declined for the largely working-class Latino and African-American population during the economic boom, as factory and other regular employment has shifted elsewhere.”

https://www.city-journal.org/html/brownout-15828.html